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dc.contributor.author Rasebotsa, N.L.
dc.contributor.author Lederer, M.S.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-11-22T10:29:31Z
dc.date.available 2011-11-22T10:29:31Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.citation Rasebotsa, N.L. & Lederer, M.S. (2010) Understanding the rural-urban dichotomy in Mositi Torontle's the victims and Unity Dow's far and beyon', Research in African Literatures, Vol. 41, No. 3, pp. 21-33 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0034-5210
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10311/926
dc.description.abstract This paper examines how place is represented in two Botswana novels, Far and Beyon’ by Unity Dow and The Victims by Mositi Torontle. Conventional notions of rural as the “authentic” experience that is threatened by moral breakdown in modern towns do not fit the experiences that these two novels describe. Instead, place reveals attitudes that influence identity formation, and it does so by foregrounding the importance of human relationships. Thus, the important point is to restore and maintain a person’s sense of belonging to a family and extended community, regardless of whether those communities are rural or urban. Breakdown threatens people when they do not know to whom they belong, regardless of where they live. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Indiana University Press, www.iupress.indiana.edu en_US
dc.subject Rural-urban dichotomy en_US
dc.subject The victims en_US
dc.subject Far and beyon en_US
dc.subject Understanding en_US
dc.title Understanding the rural-urban dichotomy in Mositi Torontle's the victims and Unity Dow's far and beyon' en_US
dc.type Published Article en_US


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