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dc.contributor.author Bernard, T.
dc.contributor.author Moetapele, N.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-02-24T10:21:43Z
dc.date.available 2010-02-24T10:21:43Z
dc.date.issued 2005
dc.identifier.citation Bernard, T. & Moetapele, N. (2005) Desiccation of the Gomoti River: Biophysical process and indigenous resource management in Northern Botswana, Journal of Arid Environments, Vol.63, pp 256-283 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0140 1963
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10311/467
dc.description.abstract For at least 200 years, Gomoti River people and their neighbours lived interactively with the Okavango flood pulse system, travelling widely in dugout canoes, practicing flood recession agriculture, fishing, hunting, and collecting wild foods. Today they are wetlanders without wetlands. A major outflow channel of the eastern Okavango Delta in the 1930s, the Gomoti River rarely flows these days. This paper explores the Gomoti’s demise, through the lenses first of science and second of Gomoti basin residents. Models developed over the past 20 years attribute the Gomoti’s drying to a complex set of bio-hydrologic processes and feedback loops that begin with sedimentation and conclude with channel switching, peat fires, and purging of toxic salts. Such models essentially omit the long history of human habitation and ecological interaction with the delta. Local people, on the other hand, tell of deliberate and systematic management of channels and floodplains, and they argue this management kept the river healthy and flowing. The picture is confounded by colonial era interventions and by Botswana government policies partitioning the Gomoti and restricting access to its headwaters. We conclude with a model combining meso-scale scientific explanation with micro-scale indigenous constructions as a context for new thinking about Okavango Delta resource management. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier http://www.doi:10.1016/j.jaridenv.2005.02.001 en_US
dc.subject River desiccation en_US
dc.subject Flood pulse system en_US
dc.subject Indigenous natural resource management en_US
dc.subject Wetland process en_US
dc.subject Human ecology en_US
dc.subject Okavango Delta en_US
dc.subject Gomoti River en_US
dc.title Desiccation of the Gomoti River: Biophysical process and indigenous resource management in Northern Botswana en_US
dc.type Published Article en_US


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