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dc.contributor.author Hambira, W.L.
dc.date.accessioned 2009-02-13T12:36:50Z
dc.date.available 2009-02-13T12:36:50Z
dc.date.issued 2007
dc.identifier.citation Hambira, W.L. 2007 Natural resources accounting: A tool for water resources management in Botswana, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, vol. 32, pp. 1310–1314 en
dc.identifier.issn 1474 7065
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10311/283
dc.description.abstract Natural Resource Accounting (NRA) has become an important environmental/natural resources management tool in recent years. It provides information on stocks of a resource available at a particular point in time and what activities the resource is being used for. The conventional System of National Income Accounts (SNA) normally does not capture the cost of depletion, degradation or pollution of natural resources. This encourages unsustainable use of natural resources since the costs are not reflected when assessing the country’s economic performance or development progress. NRA is thus an attempt to integrate environmental issues into the conventional national accounts. The water sector is one sector that could greatly benefit from this natural resource management tool. Botswana has adopted NRA as a natural resource management tool and has so far developed accounts for minerals, livestock and water. The focus of this paper is on Water Accounting (WA) in relation to Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM). IWRM is concerned with coordinated development and management of water in order to maximise economic and social welfare without compromising the sustainability of ecosystems. WA helps fill data gaps since it provides the required information for IWRM to be achieved. The aim of this paper therefore is to evaluate the Water Accounts of Botswana Report of 2006 to determine the extent to which it can contribute to integrated water resources management. The paper is based on literature review and the results show that: the available water stocks vary depending on rainfall patterns, well fields are over utilised, there has been growth in consumption, and more than 80% of the waste water produced is not being put to use. These results calls for changes in policies, role of institutions and practices pertaining to water resources management which is what IWRM is all about hence the paper concludes that indeed WA can contribute to the realisation of IWRM. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.publisher Elsevier, http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/413/description#description en
dc.subject Botswana en
dc.subject IWRM en
dc.subject Natural resources accounting en
dc.subject Water accounting en
dc.title Natural resources accounting: A tool for water resources management in Botswana en
dc.type Published Article en


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