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dc.contributor.author Nleya, P.T.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-11-15T12:47:40Z
dc.date.available 2012-11-15T12:47:40Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.citation Nleya, P.T. (2009) Relative levels of elarning readiness, applications and trainee requirements in Botswana's private sector, Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology, Vol. 35 No. 1, pp. 1 - 19 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1499-6685
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10311/1046
dc.description.abstract The rapid growth and modernization of economies in developing countries like Botswana creates new and unmet demands for certain kinds of educated and skilled labour. The expansion of secondary and tertiary school systems has also created a problem of unemployed school leavers. The growth of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), globalization and the digital divide likewise, have together put new pressures on developing countries to accelerate their development to meet these demands. This paper reports the results of a survey that sought to assess levels of eLearning readiness, applications and trainee requirements in Botswana’s private sector. Such baseline data can inform policymakers and researchers and promote the transformation required of private sector companies to become learning organizations. The findings suggested that eLearning readiness (eReadiness) levels were moderate to low, and that archaic technology (i.e., overhead projection) was used by more than half of the private sector organizations for training (with far less than half using digital eLearning applications). While the overall findings suggested low levels of eLearning readiness, applications and trainee requirements in Botswana’s private sector, seventy percent of trainers reported that their organizations encouraged them to acquire basic computer skills to facilitate eLearning. The current eLearning situation in Botswana, and the literature reviewed, demonstrates that the integration of ICTs in both developing and developed countries was a gradual process. Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) have expedited the change process in developed countries. However, several limitations are associated with such partnerships and this renders lessons for developing countries to emulate. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Athabasca University Press, http://www.aupress.ca/index.php en_US
dc.subject Educational technology en_US
dc.subject Internet en_US
dc.subject Information technology en_US
dc.subject Computer uses in education en_US
dc.subject Electronic learning en_US
dc.title Relative levels of eLearning readiness, applications and trainee requirements in Botswana’s private sector en_US
dc.type Published Article en_US
dc.link http://www.cjlt.ca/index.php/cjlt/article/view/511/241 en_US


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